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Architecture - Bamboo- Design - Ittala - Alessi - Barcelona - Paris - Venice -
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Space - Solar system - Sun - Stars - Tissot - Swatch - Raymond Weil
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Iceberg and Cape Petrel

Iceberg and Cape Petrel

First Steps

The cub takes its first tentative steps outside the den, staying as close as possible to Mom

Abandoned farm and aurora

An old abandoned farmhouse under the moonlight, with a hint of aurora borealis in the sky beyond.

Locked

Detail of abandoned motel, Tennga, GA

The little-known cloud of cosmic gas and dust called Gum 15 is the birthplace and home of hot young stars. Beautiful and deadly, these stars mould the appearance of the nebula from which they formed and, as they progress into adulthood, will eventually also destroy it.

This image was taken as part of  the ESO Cosmic Gems programme [1] using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. It shows Gum 15, located in the constellation of Vela (The Sails), some 3000 light-years from Earth [2]. This glowing cloud is a striking example of an HII region [3]. Such clouds form some of the most spectacular astronomical objects we can see; for example the Eagle Nebula (which includes the feature nicknamed “The Pillars of Creation”), the great Orion Nebula, and this less famous example, Gum 15.

Vortex and Rings

The Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn’s north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings.

The hexagon, which is wider than two Earths, owes its appearance to the jet stream that forms its perimeter. The jet stream forms a six-lobed, stationary wave which wraps around the north polar regions at a latitude of roughly 77 degrees North.

This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on April 2, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers.

The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.2 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 43 degrees. Image scale is 81 miles (131 kilometers) per pixel.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Curiosity Self-Portrait at ‘Windjana’ Drilling Site

The Soul of Kyoto by Elia Locardi - Por sucesospr.com 

www.sucesospr.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/4133.jpg

There’s something wonderful about wandering the ancient streets of Kyoto at night.

This was shot during my last visit to Japan. The big festival in Kyoto had finished the previous night, leaving the typically crowded streets empty and perfect for photography.

Street

Finland

Trees

Finland

Detail interior Temppeliaukio Church

Helsinki, Finland